Your health is our concern...

We’re here to assist you with any health challenges you may be facing with our three-tiered approach, of Food • Body • Life.  We consider all the aspects that influence health, what you eat, how you eat as well as how you move, your medical history and how these and the idiosyncrasies of your life relate to your health challenges.

The Gold Standard on the Gold Coast

We’re here to assist you with any health challenges you may be facing with our three-tiered approach we assess what you eat and you how you move, along with a wide variety of other body processes and how these systems may relate to the health challenges you are experiencing. We also explore emotions and mindset around your health concerns discovering the WHY that drives you.

Accredited Practising Dietitians

At Food • Body• Life, we are committed to providing professional, personalised nutritional advice. Our dietitians we strive to deliver up to date information and provide support in a one on one environment. We care about you and your health and go the extra distance in helping you to achieve your goals.

Where we provide our services

  • In our clinic rooms
  • Home visit
  • Phone / email consultation
  • Hospital
  • Nursing home

Food • Body• Life can offer nutrition counselling and advice covering a range of conditions including but not limited to the following:-

Overweight and obesity
Underweight
Coeliac Disease
Kidney health
Liver Health
Cardiovascular health – high blood cholesterol, blood pressure
Diabetes – Type I and Type II
Pre – diabetes
Insulin resistance

Eating Disorders
Cholesterol, Diabetes, Insulin Resistance
Gestational Diabetes
Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
Geriatric Health
Inflammatory bowel disease – crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis
Bowel Regularity
IBS

Nutrition Education
Healthy Eating
Vegetarian Eating
Pregnancy
Paediatric nutrition – infant, child, adolescent
Food Allergies and Intolerances
Metabolic Syndrome

Sports Nutrition
Maternal Health and Pregnancy
Nutrition Support
Healthy eating to optimise good health
Post surgical nutrition support
Group work shops
Menu evaluation and development

Let us help you on your journey to better health…

The key to improving your lifestyle, fitness, health and habits is truly understanding the why mindset. Why it’s important? Why do you want to change? Then being given the blueprint to make it happen! This is our key to your success and  we want to share with you on your journey to better health.

Frequently asked questions…

Some of the things you might be wanting to know.

GLYCAEMIC INDEX (GI)

The Glycaemic Index (GI) is a measure of how carbohydrate foods affect our blood glucose levels.
Some carbohydrate foods are broken down quickly while others are digested slowly.

A LOW GI carbohydrate breaks down slowly and produces a lower rise in blood glucose levels.
A HIGH GI carbohydrate digests more quickly and produces a fast rise in blood glucose levels.

Low GI food versus High GI food

Blood Sugar Response

Which Do I Choose?

Low GI carbohydrates are the best choice as they can help with:

  1. Better blood glucose control
  2. Improved insulin sensitivity
  3. Weight loss
  4. Feeling satisfied
  5. Improving blood Triglyceride levels

Incorporating GI into your meals

  • Try to include at least one low GI food at each meal and snack.
  • Studies show that when a high GI food is combined with a low GI food, the complete meal results in having a moderate GI.

Other tips to consider…..

Food is not ‘good’ or ‘bad’ only on the basis of its GI.  You should also consider:

  • Some low GI foods are high in fat – choose low-fat, low GI most of the time.
  • The quantity or amount of carbohydrate you eat is also important for good blood glucose control.  As a general rule Low GI carbohydrates are most effective when distributed evenly throughout the day. This means avoiding large meals or skipping meals.
  • You cannot work out the GI of a food by looking at the back of the food label or comparing the amount of carbohydrates a food contains.  The GI of a food is affected a number of factors. These include:
  • The amount and type of sugar in food
  • The foods acidity
  • The type of starch
  • The foods fat and fibre content
  • The protein content

The only way is to refer to a list of GI tested foods or look for this label.

GI Tested

FOOD ALLERGIES + INTOLERANCES
Food Allergy Food Intolerance
Inheritance Can be inherited
Children whom have no parents with allergy have a 20% risk of having one allergy disorder.  If one parent has an allergy disorder the risk increases to ~ 40%.  If both parents have allergy disorders then the risk increases to
60 – 70 %.
Possibly inherited
Some people are born with a sensitive constitution and react more readily to food components than others. It must be noted however, environmental triggers such as a viral infection, sudden dietary change or severe food or medication reaction can bring on symptoms at any age by altering the way the body reacts to foods.  Also physiological triggers such as hormonal changes during child-bearing years or menopause can often increase sensitivity.
Immune System Involvement Reaction involves the immune system Reactions do not involve the immune system though rather involves the stimulation of nerve endings in tissues by a chemical component.

Food Allergy Food Intolerance
Triggers Usually triggered by food proteins
i.e.

Eggs

Peanuts

Milk

Other nuts

Sesame

Gluten

Fish

Grains such as rye, what and oats

Soy

Molluscs such as oysters, mussels, clam, squid and octopus

Crustaceans such as lobster, prawns, crab and shrimp

Fruit, berries, tomato, cucumber, white potato or mustard

Food additives such as benzoates, salicylates, MSG and sulphite derivatives

Usually triggered by food chemicals and food additives i.e.

Preservatives

Artificial colours and flavours

Salicylates – found abundantly in fruits and vegetables, herbs & spices, tea & coffee, beer and wines

Amines – found in some fruit & vegetables, cheese, chocolate, wine & beer, aged meat & fish products

Naturally occurring glutamates found in stock cubes, meat & yeast extracts, tomato, cheese and pure MSG

Histamine containing and histamine releasing foods

Food Allergy Food Intolerance
Diagnosis & Reactions Can be detected by skin prick and blood tests (RAST) due to IgE antibody-mediated response

Generally seen in children and usually resolve by school age/adolescence

Occasionally occur in adult life

Reaction time of seconds to four hours.

Reactions can be severe and life-threatening – anaphylaxis

Tiny amounts of irritant can be enough to provoke a severe reaction

Immunological sensitisation occurs

Can be hard to identify irritants as cannot be diagnosed by skin prick or blood tests

Can occur at any age

Reactions are individual and vary person to person.

Effects are dose related. May be cumulative over days from eating a range of foods

Intolerances are idiosyncratic.

Immunological sensitisation does not occur as in food allergies.

Food Allergy Food Intolerance
Treatment Treatment involves avoidance of all traces of problem foods Treatment involves identifying and reducing intake of offending substances

Not one single”right” diet for people with food intolerances

Food Allergy Food Intolerance
Symptoms Symptoms include:

Itching, burning and swelling around the mouth

Runny nose

Skin rash (eczema)

Hives (urticaria – skin becomes red and raised)

Diarrhoea, abdominal cramps

Breathing difficulties, including wheezing and asthma

Vomiting, nausea

Sleep disturbances

Symptoms include but are not limited to:

Nervousness, tremor

Breathing problems

Sweating

Heart palpitations

Headache

Diarrhoea, constipation

Vomiting, nausea

Burning sensation of the skin

Tightness across the face and chest

Rapid breathing

Weight gain or loss

Abdominal pain

Bloating

Drowsiness, lethargy

Disturbed sleep patterns

Skin rash

Reflux

Symptoms can be isolated or occur in combination.

Food Allergy Food Intolerance
Body parts affected Eyes – itching, watering

Nose – stuffiness, sneezing

Mouth/lips – itching, swelling

Throat – swelling

Digestive system – stomach pain. Vomiting, diarrhoea

Skin – rashes, such as hives or atopic dermatitis

Lungs – asthma, more common in children than adults

Central nervous system – headache, irritability, fatigue, convulsions

Digestive system – nausea, stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhoea
Skin – eczema, rash, itching

Eyes – itching, watering

Nose – stuffiness, sneezing

Mouth/lips – itching, swelling

Throat – swelling

Digestive system – stomach pain. Vomiting, diarrhoea

Skin – rashes, such as hives or atopic dermatitis

Lungs – asthma, more common in children than adults

Central nervous system – headache, irritability, fatigue, convulsions

IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

What is irritable bowel syndrome?

Irritable Bowel syndrome or IBS is a disorder of the digestive tract that results from various causes. Symptoms can vary widely making a difficult disorder to identify and treat.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of IBS can vary from individual to individual and may come and go at different times of a person’s life.

Symptoms can include but are not limited to –
Constipation
Diarrhoea
Alternating episodes of constipation and diarrhoea
Abdominal cramping
Abdominal bloating
Flatulence
Burping
Reflux
Nausea
Mucus present in bowels
Heartburn
Early satiety

Causes of IBS

While the exact causes of IBS are unknown, it is acknowledged that certain environmental factors can exacerbate symptoms.

These include – 
Stress
Diet
Eating habits
Hyper-sensitivity of the gut
Bacterial infection of the gut
Virus or parasite infection

Common dietary aggravators

Fruit
Wheat
Lactose
Onions
Fatty foods
Spicy foods
Alcohol
Artificial sweeteners
Gaseous vegetables such as cabbage, cauliflower
Inadequate dietary fibre

Treatment

Treatment of IBS symptoms means treating those factors which are exacerbating the condition. If stress is flaring up symptoms, then stress relief treatment needs to be targeted, e.g. relaxation strategies. Help from a dietitian and general practitioner can help in identifying those factors which play a role in your IBS symptoms and dietary components which are affecting you.

It is also important to rule out other possible diseases and disorders such as coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis, endometriosis and cancer.

In addition, you may need the aid of medication or supplementation in helping to improve the health of your gut, eg. Probiotics

COELIAC DISEASE

Coeliac Disease is caused by an immune reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, triticale and oats. In Coeliac Disease, the cells of the small bowel (intestine) are damaged. This causes a flattening of the tiny, finger like projections called villi which line the inside of the bowel.

View of Villi in the Bowel
Untreated Villi
Normal Villi
Villi in person with untreated Coeliac Disease

The function of the cells on normal villi is to break down and absorb nutrients in food. In Coeliac Disease these cells become flat and inflamed causing decreased absorption of nutrients and minerals from food. This leads to deficiencies in vitamins, iron, folic acid and calcium. Sugars, proteins and fats are often poorly absorbed as well.

CAUSE

The cause is not known. However, it is thought that people with Coeliac Disease have an immune system which perceives gluten to be ‘foreign’ and reacts by initiating an immune response that causes damage to the lining of the small intestine. Both genetic and environmental factors are though to play a role with Coeliac Disease as it can occur at any age.

DIAGNOSIS

Diagnosis requires microscopic examination of a small bowel biopsy in order to demonstrate that the villi are damaged. This involves a gastroscopy (passing a tube from the mouth into the gut) to sample the wall of the small intestine. A blood test for characteristic anti-gliadin antibodies only, is not sufficient. It is important to have the biopsy before commencing a gluten free diet to ensure a definite diagnosis. To confirm a diagnosis, the biopsy should be repeated after 6-12 months of commencing a gluten free diet, to demonstrate improvement to the villi.

TREATMENT

The only treatment for Coeliac Disease is the lifelong adherence to gluten-free diet. When gluten is removed from the diet, the small intestine will start to heal and overall health improves. Even small amounts of gluten can cause some damage to the lining of the small intestine without any obvious symptoms. There is no agreement amongst doctors, scientists and dietitians as to what (if any) is a safe level of gluten in the diet for someone with coeliac disease, The Coeliac Society of Australia Inc believes that gluten should be entirely removed, but individuals should consult their dietitian or doctor.

LONG TERM RISKS

The long term risks of undiagnosed Coeliac Disease or non-adherence to the gluten-free diet include:-

  • chronic poor health
  • miscarriages
  • osteoporosis due to calcium malabsorption
  • depression
  • infertility
  • dental enamel defects
  • lymphoma
  • risk of gastrointestinal & oesophageal carcinoma

It is sensible to have your blood checked annually for iron and folic acid levels, and to have a bone mineral density test performed at approximately 5 year intervals.

DIET COMPARISON
The Diet Dr. Atkins
The Creator Dr. Robert Atkins, MD
The Plan A 4 phase eating plan that involves restricting carbohydrates, and recommends abundant amounts of protein and fat. Approximately 50% Fat, 30% PRO, and 5-15% carbohydrates
The Science We burn carbohydrates before fat, if we restrict carbs our body will start to burn its own fat for energy = ketosis = weight loss.
Potential Short & Long Term
Problems
Short Term

  • Low energy levels and irritability due to lack of carbohydrates
  • Constipation due to lack of dietary fibre and fluid losses
  • Bad breath due to production of ketones – chemicals produced when carbohydrate intake is low and fat is used for energy
  • Ketosis – ketones become toxic to the body and cause headache, nausea and hyperventilation

Long Term

  • Nutritional deficiencies due to limited food choices
  • Reduced metabolic rate – due to a decrease in muscle, making weight control more difficult
  • Bowel disease and colon cancer from prolonged constipation
  • Heart disease – due to high saturated fat intake
  • Kidney problems – due to very high protein intake
  • Osteoporosis as calcium absorption is affected
The Diet South Beach
The Creator Dr. Arthur Agaston, MD
The Plan A 3 phase plan that involves eating the “right” carbohydrates and promotes avoidance of refined carbohydrates like sugar/white flour.  In the 1st phase of the plan carbohydrates are very restricted and it promotes lean meats, seafood, olive oil & canola oil.
The Science Eating more protein, healthy fats and fewer carbohydrates causes less hunger cravings and insulin in blood.
Potential Short & Long Term
Problems
Some nutritionists feel that the weight lost in beginning can be drastic and result in loss of a lot of water in the body.  On the other hand, many nutritionists support this diet as being healthy and suggest drinking lots of water to replace what is lost.
The Diet The Zone
The Creator Dr. Barry Sears, MD
The Plan This plan involves eating a certain ratio of carbohydrates, fats, and protein at every meal i.e. 40% carbohydrates, 30% fat and 30% PRO.
The Science Similar to plans above in that eating more fat and protein will reduce food cravings and lead to weight loss through burning fat not carbohydrates.
Potential Short & Long Term
Problems
Constant measuring of portions and calculating calories could be tedious.  Possible vitamin and mineral deficiencies in long run.
The Diet Macro-biotic
The Creator Numerous authors of Macrobiotic books
The Plan Oriental style vegetarian diet.  Approximate guidelines:  30% veges, 10% brothy soup, 10% beans and sea veges, 50% whole grains.  Occasional added seafood, nuts, fruit
The Science Belief that a low fat, high fiber diet using fresh ingredients will cause weight loss and become a dietary pattern for life.
Potential Short & Long Term
Problems
Limited food choices may cause nutritional deficiencies such as iron, vitamin D to name a few.  Food preparation can be time consuming.
The Diet Raw Foods
The Creator Paul Nison; Juliano Brotman and Ericka Lekert
The Plan Eating only vegetarian foods in their raw, preferably organic, uncooked state without chemicals or preservatives.
The Science Cooking kills enzymes and nutrients in our food causing our bodies to use its own enzymes to digest the food we eat.  (Anything cooked higher then about 118 degrees) The idea, therefore, is that raw foods give optimal nutrition.
Potential Short & Long Term
Problems
Limited food choices may cause deficiencies in vitamin B12, D to name a few.  May be difficult to stick with due to limited food choices. Possibly too low in healthy fats/PRO.
The Diet Eat Right for your Blood Type
The Creator Dr. Peter D’Adamo, ND
The Plan Depending on your blood type – you follow a set diet based on what your ancestors ate i.e. “O” blood types should consume high PRO/Fat. “A”bloods types should consume high majority of food as carbohydrates.  While “B”or “AB” can consume a variety of carbohydrates, fats, and PRO.
The Science Belief blood types evolved in order of o, A, B and AB.  Therefore types O, A, ate certain foods in historically such as primarily meat or grain.  Then B, AB developed later and were able to eat both meat and vegetables or a varied diet.
Potential Short & Long Term
Problems
Hasn’t been under much scientific study and does not cite research to support evolutionary claims about nutrition.  Again, nutrient deficiencies may develop due to dietary imbalance and avoidance of certain foods if followed long term.
The Diet Dr. Phil
The Creator Dr. Phillip McGraw, PhD
The Plan A cognitively based diet plan following several outlined tips for success.  Meal plans include carbohydrates, vegies, lean meats and healthy fats and allows fruit
The Science Through pre-planned meals/menus in his book, Dr. Phil explains why “high-response” foods are good and “low response” foods are bad.  Uses behaviour modification in addition to diet for weight control.
Potential Short & Long Term
Problems
Weight loss pills that are promoted are questionable and very expensive.   Nutritionists suggest he has just recycled well-used weight plans from the past.
The Diet Sugar Busters
The Creator H. Leighton Steward; Morrison C. Bethea, MD;  Sam S. Andrews, MD; Luis A. Balart, MD
The Plan A plan that’s similar to The Zone but calls for 40% Fat, 30% PRO and 30% carbohydrates.  Elimination of sugars is key to this diet.
The Science Through choosing healthy carbohydrates, fats and protein and eliminating all sources of insulin increasing sugars out of our diet will cause weight reduction.
Potential Short & Long Term
Problems
Short Term

  • Low energy levels and irritability due to lack of carbohydrates
  • Constipation due to lack of dietary fibre and fluid losses
  • Bad breath due to production of ketones – chemicals produced when carbohydrate intake is low and fat is used for energy
  • Ketosis – ketones become toxic to the body and cause headache, nausea and hyperventilation

Long Term

  • Nutritional deficiencies due to limited food choices
  • Reduced metabolic rate – due to a decrease in muscle, making weight control more difficult
  • Bowel disease and colon cancer from prolonged constipation
  • Heart disease – due to high saturated fat intake
  • Kidney problems – due to very high protein intake
  • Osteoporosis as calcium absorption is affected
The Diet Dr. Ornish
The Creator Dr. Dean Ornish, MD
The Plan This plan is a low fat, plant-based diet of fruits, vegies, whole grains, beans, soy in natural forms.  10% of total calories can come from fat.  Excludes all cooking oils (except canola) and most animal products.
The Science This plan was originally developed to reverse heart disease, but has been adapted for those who don’t have heart disease.  Based on the theory that low fat diets and lots of healthy carbohydrates will cause weight reduction.
Potential Short & Long Term
Problems
Does allow white sugar and white flour.  Limiting animal products may cause deficiency in Vit B12, Vit D, calcium, and more.  Not enough healthy PRO and fats may leave gaps in nutritional needs.
HOW REAL FOOD LABELS

Labels can be confusing and hard to understand. To make healthier food choices check what you are eating by learning to read the information on food products.

Step 1: Read the ingredient list

Ingredients are listed in order from the largest to the smallest amount used, based on the weight of the ingredient.

Step 2: Look for Hidden Ingredients

Sometimes ingredients may be listed by a name you are not familiar with. Check the list below.

FAT
SUGAR
SALT
FIBRE
Animal Fat*
Butter Fat*
Cocoa Butter*
Coconut Oil*
Coconut Cream*
Copha*
Diglycerides
Full Cream Milk
Ghee*
Hydrogenated Fat/Oils*
Lard*
Margarine
Non-Animal Fat
Palm oil*
Shortening*
Solids*
Sour Cream*
Tallow*
Vegetable Fat

*High in Saturated Fat
Concentrated Fruit Juice
Condensed Milk
Corn Syrup
Disaccharides
Dextrose
Dried Fruit
Fructose
Golden Syrup
Glucose Syrup
Lactose
Malt Extract
Maltose
Mannitol
Molasses
Sorbitol
Sucrose
Treacle
Xylitol 
Baking Powder
Baking Soda
Booster
Celery Salt
Garlic Salt
Meat Extract
MSG (monosodium glutamate)
Onion Salt
Rock Salt
Sea Salt
Sodium
Sodium Bicarbonate
Sodium Metabisulphite
Sodium Nitrate/Nitrite
Stock Cubes
Vegetable Extract
Vegetable Salt
Yeast Extract
Bran
Barley
Barley Bran
Buckwheat
Hi-Maize Starch
Oatbran
Resistant Starch
Rolled Barley
Rolled Oats
Rye
Wheat Bran
Wholegrain
Wholemeal
Wheatmeal
Wholewheat
** If one of these ingredients is listed in the first three ingredients or if the ingredient list contains several of these ingredients, then the food product is likely to be high in saturated fat, sugar or salt.

Step 3: Read the Nutritional Panel

Sometimes it is not clear from the ingredient list whether a product is suitable or not. It is often helpful to read the Nutrition Panel. What to look for per 100g of a product:

  • Total Fat – less then 10g per 100g.
  • Saturated Fat – less then 3g per 100g.
  • Sugars – less then 15g per 100g. If the food contains a natural sugar like fruit (fructose), aim for less then 25g per 100g.
  • Dietary Fibre – more then 5g or more per 100g.
  • Sodium – less then 120mg sodium per 100g.

In this example, product 1 is the healthier choice because:

It is lower in saturated fat, added sugar and sodium and is higher in fibre than product 2.

Product 1 is lower in saturated fat, added sugar and sodium and is higher in fibre than Product 2

It starts with WHY .... for a healthy bright future.

As dietitian’s, we consider all the aspects that influence health. What you eat, how you eat as well as how you move, your medical history and how these and the idiosyncrasies of your life relate to your health challenges.

Finding you’re “why” is essential to the vision of your health. Why the investment in your health is worthwhile, why the vision of your healthy life starts with nutrition, why the emotions and beliefs are linked to your health concerns.  This is the basis of the method we have used over the last 30 years that has provided the real results for our patients.

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Let us help you with a personalised fuel for success program...

With a Food Body Life success program, there are no stones left unturned we look at all the aspect for success in your discipline. Food for your sport goes beyond what a personal trainer would give you the key to success in sport must include body composition, diet, intolerances, fueling and recovery, supplementation that's why we look at Food Body and Life to achieve the best YOU.